Tree in Winter (Download)

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Black & White – Tree in Winter

Simple, elegant and inspiring image of a tree produced in mono to influence the viewers eye toward the dormant nature of the tree. One of the most powerful motifs in landscape photography is that of the lone tree, standing tall, proud and defiant. Trees are incredibly photogenic, at any time of the year. The bare twisted branches of the winter tree set against a dark sullen sky makes a great subject for black and white.

Learn the story behind this photograph

Description

Black & White – Tree in Winter

Simple, elegant and inspiring image of a tree produced in mono to influence the viewers eye toward the dormant nature of the tree. One of the most powerful motifs in landscape photography is that of the lone tree, standing tall, proud and defiant. Trees are incredibly photogenic, at any time of the year. The bare twisted branches set against a dark sullen sky makes a great subject for black and white. There’s something special about a beautifully produced black and white photograph, as the enduring popularity of the work of greats such as Ansel Adams or Edward Weston continue to testify. The technology may have changed since Ansel’s day, with digital capture and inkjet printing, but the aim is the same: to produce great photographs. Learn the story behind this photograph

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It’s common knowledge that trees become bare during winter, but not many people actually know how they keep themselves alive during the bitter cold. The animals you see during the winter keep moving and eat more food than usual to survive winter, and the ones you don’t see are hibernating. Trees go through a process similar to hibernation called dormancy, and that is what keeps them alive during the winter. To survive winter cold, a tree begins its preparations in late summer as day length shortens. Cold acclimation occurs gradually and includes a number of physiological changes in leaves, stems, and roots. And while autumn colour seems to get all the attention, it’s what trees do later in autumn that is the most stunning, if harder to see. Some of these later changes really do seem to border on magic, and while some of the details remain a mystery to science, general mechanisms have been explained.

Photograph Specification:

Taken: Feb 2018 File Size/Type: 13 MB, Jpeg Dimension: 4000 × 4000 pixels Camera Model: Canon 5DSR Camera Lens:EF ISO: 100 Focal Length: 27mm Aperture: f11 Shutter Speed: 1/50sec Post Processed: Yes – Lightroom CC & Photoshop CC  

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